Review: Uncut Gems (2019)

There is no doubt that Uncut Gems, directed by Josh and Benny Safdie who also co-wrote the script with Ronald Bronstein, feels like the missing film at the Oscars. Starring Adam Sandler, the film centres on a New York jeweller and gambling addict Howard Ratner as he tries to stay one step ahead of a series of bad debts and terrible decisions.

Not only is this film one of the most anxious and compulsive cinematic journeys of recent years, but it’s also the one of the most complete. Every moment feels integral, as does the city of New York itself with its electric pulse and sea of humanity. On top of this the cast is phenomenal. Sandler, a constant ball of tension, absolutely inhabits the brilliantly named central character but the supporting players are all perfect. Particular praise goes to Julia Fox and Idina Menzel as the two women in Howard’s life, reflecting the conflict that your brain is going through.

This could be the film of the year and it almost killed me.

Highly Recommended.

Review: Jojo Rabbit (2019)

Directed by Taika Waititi, Jojo Rabbit tells the story of a fanatical member of the Hitler Youth in the last days of WWII who is forced to question his devotion to the cause when events land closer to home. The gag is that Jojo is a ten year old boy, and Hitler is his imaginary friend. The disappointment is that the film is completely empty.

With an aesthetic that leans heavily on the cinema of Wes Anderson, and Nazi officers that have goosestepped straight out of ‘Allo ‘Allo, the film struggles to find it’s own feel and the few moments of laughter that do pop up have no actual attachment to the context (not hard when there isn’t one). This is also true of the drama. The antagonists in the film are drawn so widely that they have no power and exert no danger whilst one moment of intended heartbreak is so divorced from the perpetrators that is is rendered almost meaningless.

Jojo Rabbit reads like a movie made by a culture so dominated by a comic book sensibility that it is now incapable of discussing actual ideas. A movie where a murderous, nationalist, racial insanity is neatly compartmentalised down to a bunch of cartoon idiots. Of course, cartoon Nazi’s have been done before but spend five minutes in the presence of a film like To Be or Not to Be (1942) and you’ll see the difference. Ernst Lubitsch’s film has a lot of broad strokes, the Nazi’s are preening, idiotic in their devotion, even clownish, the humour is dark, but he never lets us forget the danger. In contrast, Jojo Rabbit just doesn’t seem interested in anything outside of the central conceit and, as a result, there is nothing there.

Our Next Screening: Bait

Our first film of 2020 is Mark Jenkin’s Bait (2019).

Martin is a fisherman without a boat, his brother Steven having re-purposed it as a tourist tripper. With their childhood home now a get-away for London money, Martin is displaced to the estate above the harbour.

Film critic Mark Kermode calls Bait “a genuine modern masterpiece, which establishes Jenkin as one of the most arresting and intriguing British film-makers of his generation.

Suitable for ages 15+ (BBFC info)All pre-bookers will be entered into a draw for a movie to take home. 

Our Next Screening: Blade Runner

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Original advert for Blade Runner’s 1982 run at Guernsey’s Gaumont Cinema.

Based in November 2019, Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner (1982) remains one of the most iconic sci-fi movies ever made. As a piece of visual design its impact is still being felt, whilst the story it tells is remains a point of debate amongst fans.

It’s also a film that splits opinion.

 

On it’s release in 1982 it wasn’t well received by critics and there are plenty of criticisms that are hard to shake; it’s a detective film without much detecting, its sexual politics were old hat when it was released, and one has to wonder where the film would sit if it hadn’t been revised and re-released in different forms (my set contains five versions!)…

…and yet the film endures and, thirty seven years after it was originally screened at The Gaumont Cinema, we are bringing the original theatrical cut (the ‘European Theatrical Cut’ to be precise) back to the big screen in Guernsey.

The screening takes place at Beau Cinema at 7.30pm on Wednesday 27 November.

Suitable for ages 15+

Tickets £7 – Book Here

Our Next Screening: Apollo 11

7.30pm, Thursday 7 November 2019

Apollo 11 is a stunning cinematic event fifty years in the making so we thought this would be a great reason to return to Beau Cinema!

Featuring never-before-seen large-format film footage of one of humanity’s greatest accomplishments, this is a one night only chance to see one of this year’s most talked about documentaries on Guernsey’s largest screen.

The Observer calls Apollo 11 “a front row seat for the moon landing”.

This film is rated ‘U’.

Tickets for this event are available at flexible prices.

£7 – Standard: This is the standard Clameur Du Cinema ticket price. We believe that this is a fair price for a good movie and it allows us to cover the cost of our events
£5 – Low Budget/Large Groups: We recognise that the standard ticket price may not be suitable for everyone but would still love to see you at the screening. This would also be a great option for large groups.
£10 – Donation Ticket: You want to buy a ticket and also want to give a little extra support to your local, volunteer run, cinema night.
Book online at www.guernseytickets.gg

Our Next Screening: Diego Maradona

On Wednesday 16 October we are screening Asif Kapadia’s latest documentary Diego Maradona. This is another fantastic film from the director of Senna and Amy.

Constructed from over 500 hours of never-before-seen footage, this documentary centres on the career of celebrated football player Diego Armando Maradona, who played for S.S.C. Napoli in the 1980s.

You can book tickets here

All pre-bookers will be entered into a draw for the chance to take a movie home.

New Podcast Episode: Lords of Chaos

Our Lords of Chaos episode is now available for listening and downloading on Soundcloud, ITunes and other podcast apps.

The episode features Wynter Tyson, Lizze Loveridge and Mat Walters plus an interview with local musician Brett Stewart. In the ‘Afterword’ section we discuss the explosion of popcorn that is Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs and Shaw.

Cameron Tyson provides the music.

Brett Stewart plays in Guernsey based band Dolmens.

Information on future screenings can be found here.

Our Next Screening: High Life (28 August)

Our August screening is Claire Denis’ High Life starring Robert Pattinson and Juliette Binoche. The film follows a group of criminals who are sent on a mission to travel toward a black hole while taking part in scientific experiments.

High Life is the filmmaker at her most dark, a mesmerising, patience-testing, violent exploration in the darkest reaches of outer and inner space.– Empire Magazine.

This screening is taking place in advance of the home video release in September.

 

Suitable for ages 18+

All pre-bookers will be entered into a draw for a movie to take home.

Book here.

Our Next Screening: Lords of Chaos (31 July)

On 31 July we are screening Jonas Akerlund’s Lords of Chaos.

Based in Norway in the early 1990s, the film tells the story of Norwegian Black Metal band  Mayhem. It weaves together rock n roll delinquency, death and betrayal and is, by turns, shocking, funny and tragic.

Suitable for ages 18+

Tickets £7 – Book Here