January Screening: Khrustalyov, My Car!

Clameur Du Cinema’s January screening is Aleksey Germain’s Khrustalyov, My Car! (1998).

Originally released in 1998 and presented here in a newly restored 4k scan, Khrustalyov, My Car! focuses on military doctor General Klenski who is arrested in Stalin’s Russia in 1953 during an anti–Semitic political campaign and accused of being a participant in a so-called “doctors plot”. It is regarded as an inspiration behind Armando Ianucci’s The Death Of Stalin (2017), and remains one of Aleksey German’s most enduring and satirical films amongst his exclusive body of work with includes the unforgettable Hard to Be a God (2013).

“Khrustalyov, My Car! is relentless and overpowering, yet the film is often poetic in its blend of pathos, freneticism, surrealism and matter of factness” – Time Out

“In this snowbound fever dream, beauty and anarchic humour co-exist with horror” – The Wall Street Journal

All pre-bookers will be entered into a draw for a copy of The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov and The Death of Stalin by Fabien Nury and Thierry Robin, the comic that inspired the movie.

Suitable for ages 18+

The screening takes place at 7.30pm on Wednesday 30 January 2019.

Tickets can be booked here.

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November Screening: The Rider (2018)

7pm, Wednesday 28 November 2018.

Written and directed by Chloé Zhao, The Rider, based on the real experiences of it’s main cast, tells the story of a young cowboy’s search for new identity and what it means to be a man in the heartland of America after a traumatic head injury.

“Movies that blend real life and fiction usually foreground the docu-style realism, using the poetry as grace notes or punctuation. Zhao privileges both, and in so doing creates a work of heartbreaking beauty.” – Bilge Ebiri, Village Voice

 

Suitable for ages 15+

Tickets: £6 – Book Here

Halloween Screening: “No Strings Attached”.

Join us for a Halloween double-bill of two brand new movies that hark back to the era of VHS.

One is a horror inflected tech-thriller and the other is a (fairy)tale of evil cults starring one of the most prolific actors currently working. Both films are from solid film-makers who are responsible for some of the most memorable genre films of recent years and both would look entirely at home on the shelf of a video rental store.

You’ll have fun and, if you pre-book, you’ll be entered into a draw for a 7 film Blumhouse blu-ray boxset.

Suitable for ages 18+

The screening takes place at 7pm on Wednesday 31 October. Tickets cost £8 and can be booked here.

I’m starting a film night!

So, I’ve booked a venue, sorted three films and licensing, and chosen a name. I’m starting a film night.

I’ve screened films before, and talk about them endlessly, but it’s time to actually create a regular film night and share all the new, odd and interesting films that don’t get a look in on Guernsey’s screens. The films are vital, but it’s the audiences that will make it a success and their engagement and enjoyment.

So here we go…

The night is called Clameur Du Cinéma and won’t be as pretentious as it sounds. It takes place on the first Wednesday of every month at Guernsey’s Digital Greenhouse (a great interactive venue) starting on 4 July 2018 with Beast (2017). I’ve also booked Funny Cow (2017) and Phantom of the Paradise (1974). Tickets can be booked here.

Here goes, wish me luck…

Wynter

Goodbye to CineGuernsey

This week I heard the sad news that our local cinema society CineGuernsey would be closing after 11 years.  During that time it screened a wide variety of independent, foreign, and classic cinema to appreciative audiences.  Unfortunately, new, easier ways of accessing film (VOD) and ever decreasing cinematic release windows have led to lower audience numbers and the society’s inability to cover screening costs.  Which is sort of bitter-sweet as part of CineGuernsey’s mission was to broaden interest in cinema and they have certainly helped do that.

So if more people are watching more films on demand, if our local cinema is showing a massively increased variety of films compared to five years ago what have we actually lost?

The answer is conversation.

CineGuernsey didn’t just choose films to show, they curated.  Films were chosen after debate and discussion by the committee.  Why are we showing this?  Does it expand our understanding of film or the wider world?  Does it start a conversation?  In addition each film would have an introduction.  Sometimes a look at the director or screenwriter, sometimes a delve into the film and it’s production, there were also short story readings, Q&As with film makers, parallels with current events, discussions and even short films that complimented the main feature (Elephant (2003) and Elephant (1989) pictured above was one example).  Questions and comments were always welcome and no audience walked out in silence.

That’s a big loss especially when every cinema lover’s favourite question is ‘have you seen?’.

Screenings are, and always will be, a massively important part of film culture and so are the conversations that they inspire.  They are a place for a community to discover and discuss art, laugh, cry and hide behind their hands.

CineGuernsey will be much missed.  Thanks to all those that have been involved over the years, the films were wonderful and so were the people.

Goodbye CineGuernsey… or maybe À la perchoine if someone can figure out the economics.

 

 

BBC Guernsey Film Reviews (August 2015)

Here’s me on BBC Guernsey with Oliver Guillou reviewing August 2015 releases and looking forward to September.

Films being reviewed; Fantastic Four (2015), Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation (2015), The Man from Uncle (2015), Hard to Be a God (2013), Southpaw (2015), Trainwreck (2015), Pixels (2015), Videodrome (1983)… and I’m still banging on about about Mad Max: Fury Road (2015).

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p02zdj2q

Starts at 02:09. Originally broadcast on 29.08.15.

You have to stop understanding! Stop understanding what you are saying! Stop understanding and listen to me!

BBC Guernsey Film Reviews (July 2015)

Okay, so a couple of months ago I was invited to take part in a monthly film review segment on BBC Radio Guernsey with Saturday morning presenter Oliver Guillou, the idea was to review that month’s films and preview the next month’s.  I was supposed to be on for about 20ish minutes and we filled an hour because we be nerds.  This month (third time lucky) I think I’ve started to hit my stride.

Here’s the link to the show on BBC IPlayer (skip to 02:09:55)

http://bbc.in/1Kqqwcq

Films being reviewed: Magic Mike XXL, Terminator Genisys, Minions, Ant Man, Ted 2, Amy, Jupiter Ascending and Inside Out.

Let me know what you think.

I say ‘kind of’ far too much.  Kind of.

Beau Cinema: June 2015 Picks

Beau Cinema’s June screenings are up and the full list can be found at http://beausejour.gg/cinema but here are my picks;

From 8 – 13 June they are holding a bit of a sci-fest (sorry about that) with 3D screenings of Edge of Tomorrow (2014), Gravity (2013), Pacific Rim (2013), Prometheus (2012), Star Trek Into Darkness (2013) and Godzilla (2014).  If you can only go to one I would suggest Gravity, it’s a great opportunity to see it on a larger screen and the use of 3D’s weird miniaturizing effect is devastating.  I’m also duty bound to recommend Pacific Rim because a giant robot hits a giant monster with a giant boat.

About Time (2013) Richard Curtis’ time-travel romance (screening on 25th June) is also a touching film about fathers and sons.  It deserves to be wider seen and you can find a short review here – https://sarniacinemagsy.wordpress.com/2014/04/22/abouttime/

The Wizard of Oz (1939) and Jaws (1975) speak for themselves and are screening on 28th and 30th June respectively.

…but Film of the Month for June is undoubtedly Shaun the Sheep Movie (2015).  It’s a genuine pleasure of a movie and one that parents and children can enjoy together.  85 mins of bliss.

Tickets can be booked online at http://www.guernseytickets.gg or from Beau Sejour.